Posts Tagged ‘education’

Engage, Entertain, and Educate – The Three E’s of Creating Office Decor for Kids

August 1st, 2018

IDS has gained notoriety as being the go-to company for creating office spaces designed with children in mind. When we design for kids we of course engineer the toughest product available, but we also look at the psychological side of how our creations will help children prepare for an appointment.

For this we follow the Three E’s: Engage, Entertain, and Educate!
 

Engage

Passively sitting and waiting for an appointment allows children’s anxiety to grow and fester. IDS wants to engage kids’ minds and bodies in activities in order to distract and calm them, creating good memories associated with their visit to the dentist. You won’t see faces like this at an IDS themed office:

Young patients aren’t just at an office for treatment; they are there to learn. Proving children an opportunity to engage in their education encourages a deeper understanding of their oral health, setting them up for a future of healthy teeth!

The end goal we hope to achieve by transforming an office is to promote a better appointment to allow for smoother, faster treatments and to encourage care to be continued at home.
 

Entertain

Time flies when you’re having fun! This phrase exists for a reason. The busier someone is during a time interval, the faster that time interval will feel like it has passed. There is a lot less time for a child to get anxious, bored, or build up tension about an upcoming procedure if they are lost in play.

From the study Influence of Positive Distractions on Children in Two Clinic Waiting Areas:

“Data analysis shows that the introduction of distraction conditions was associated with more calm behavior and less fine and gross movement, suggesting significant calming effects associated with the distraction conditions. Data also suggest that positive distraction conditions are significant attention grabbers and could be an important contributor to improving the waiting experience for children in hospitals by improving environmental attractiveness.”

IDS gaming tablets, slides, theaters, and play forts provide a number of outlets for kids to burn energy and reduce stress. Whether they are crawling around a play area, laughing at a funny kids movie playing in the theater, or using their mind to solve puzzles on an iPad, kids are having fun!

children palying on gaming tablets in reception area

The proof is in the reviews from parents. Taken from actual online reviews of our clients:

“Makes coming to the dentist fun and something to look forward to!”

“My son left the dentist with a huge smile, asking to come back again!!”

“If you’re a kid and you need to go to the dentist, this is the place to go! The atmosphere is fun, friendly, and eases the anxiety of seeing a dentist!”

If our theming isn’t fun for kids, then we’re not doing our jobs!
 

Educate

Last, but not least, we want to encourage the education of your patients when they visit your office. While making sure kids are having fun is our main goal, we want to ensure that we have an impact on the health of children as well.

Chair-side education is the current model for delivering information to patients. But is this the best way for them to absorb information? Studies show that using passive learning vs active learning creates a stark contrast in the retention of a lesson.

Many studies have found that, while individuals have various learning styles, on average people remember 90% of what they do compared to 20% of what they hear. When you were a student, did you learn more in a lecture hall or when you were actively working on a patient’s mouth? Kids are the same. Passive learning disempowers the student and takes the fun out of learning.

It is important that education is fun at a young age. Research has shown that if students do not consider a learning activity worthy of their time and effort, they might not engage or may even disengage all together in response (Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris, 2004).

Waiting rooms are a place where children can experience hands-on learning and experiment with large replica teeth and other educational installations while still feeling as if they are just playing.

A large tooth with a cavity that emits a foul stink when you press a button gives a vivid demonstration of what actually happens to a rotten mouth. That’s memorable!

IDS is dedicated to helping your patients have the best possible experience when they visit your office. Every office we create is ready to Engage, Entertain, and Educate!

 

IDS Experts – Dental Education Stations Engage Patients While They Wait

May 30th, 2017

As an expert at designing displays for museums and engaging children in educational activities, I know how to attract people to focal points, create a safe and interactive environment, and make education a fun activity.

Educating the public is a skill. Whether it’s for museum visitors or dental and medical patients, the same rules apply.

Here are the questions I ask myself during every project we create here at IDS:

  • Will the target audience be engaged and find it appealing?
  • Is the content clear and are the learning outcomes relevant to what you want to express?
  • Is it durable, safe, and robust enough to handle children?
  • If there are moving parts or any electronics, is there a plan for ongoing maintenance?

Part of the education we provide is through interactive displays and education stations. These are a great way to engage both children and adults and can be a fun way to draw people in for a more appealing and memorable dental experience.

Our latest tool for helping dentists educate patients is the Education Station. Whether it’s a feature in your waiting room, or a dedicated educational room filled with different stations that teach various aspects of dental care, there is a lot we can teach young patients about their teeth.

These stations include great educational tools like:

  • A giant model of a mouth so children can learn how to brush and floss their teeth.
  • An interactive station lets them touch and smell giant teeth with stinky cavities.
  • Microscopes that reveal real plaque up close while an illustrated graphic explains why plaque is bad.
  • A custom quiz app tests their dental knowledge.

Using touch, smell, informative visuals, hands-on tutorials, and electronic games, Education Stations are engaging for different ages and will be appealing to different learning styles. Patients are given a new level of education that they might not receive at home.
 

Designing interactives that are strong enough for kids.

I often need to ask questions such as “what is the best case to protect this tablet’s screen from damage?” and “what size of screws are needed to keep this item secure?”. I ensure that the interactives we add to office environments are durable enough for everyday wear and tear from children while still delivering the fun or educational message you want to convey.

As a company, we focus on details that may seem insignificant to some, but to us, they are extremely important and can transform an office from typical to extraordinary.

From our artists to our engineers, we pride ourselves on the level of expertise each team member brings to the projects we create. Our experts want to offer some insight into their work and offer professional advice to help your dental office reach its full potential.

April
Pre-Production Manager
Exhibit Design Diploma
Joined IDS in 2011
 

Fun Facts for Kids – We Speak the Tooth – 3 Silly Dental Sayings to Share with Your Patients and Staff

May 2nd, 2017

Yeah, we’ve all heard them, those popular sayings that have to do with teeth. Maybe the lack of dentistry back in the dark ages made teeth quite the topic of conversation; whatever the reason, a number of ‘toothy’ sayings are still with us today and have some interesting history to go along with them.

 

1. “Long in the tooth” dates back to the 16th century and related to horses because as they age their teeth continue to grow. These changes and characteristics of their teeth make it possible to estimate a horse’s age. As an obvious reference to getting older, it’s fine to say such things about a horse, but it certainly isn’t flattering when talking about humans!

 

2. We’ve all done this at one stage in our lives: “bit off more than we can chew”. Thinking we can do it all, but actually putting ourselves in a bit of a predicament with an overloaded schedule. Funny enough this saying’s meaning is quite literal. Dating back to the 1800s when many Americans chewed tobacco, eager ‘chewers’ literally bit off too large a chunk of tobacco and couldn’t manage it, and so the saying was born. Gross!

 

3. If you’ve ever faced a difficult situation, maybe something you weren’t looking forward to or even something that scared you, you have likely used the phrase “time to bite the bullet”. Your meaning being that you are just going to do it and get it over with.

Well, whatever the situation is that is causing hesitation it certainly couldn’t be as bad as how this phrase came to be. Prior to anesthesia, the only distraction or respite surgeons could offer patients undergoing surgery was liquor and putting a lead bullet between their teeth for them to bite away the pain – YE-OUCH!!

 

What other old tooth-related sayings can you think of? Try and get your patients to think of some during their next appointment.

 

Fun Facts – Give Your Staff a Quick History Lesson with These 5 Famous Dentists!

April 1st, 2015

Here are 5 facts you can share with your staff and patients. From a Hollywood actor to one of the earliest photographers, these dentists have done a lot more than just ensure healthy smiles!

 

1. Friedrich “Fritz’ Pfeffer

(30 April 1889-20 December 1944)
Mr. Pfeffer, a German dentist, was a Jewish refugee who hid with Anne Frank during the Nazi Occupation of the Netherlands. He died in the Neuengamme concentration camp which was located in Northern Germany. Anne Frank wrote about Mr. Pfeffer in her diary, but to protect his identity she referred to him as Albert Dussel. While not a fun fact, it is a meaningful fact and notable in history.

A young Dr. Pfeffer alongside his two brothers, Ernst and Emil. Photo from: http://www.annefrankguide.net/en-GB/bronnenbank.asp?aid=10632

 

2. Dr. Samuel A. Bemis
(1793-1881)
Dr. Bemis is one of the earliest known photographers in the United States and some of his daguerreotypes (a photograph taken by an early photographic process employing an iodine-sensitized silvered plate and mercury vapor) survive to this day. He was practicing dentistry in April of 1840 when he acquired a camera, becoming one of the first Americans to take a photograph. His photos are some of the earliest known American images of natural landscapes, at a time when photographers mostly shot portraits.

This early photo shot by Dr. Bemis dates all the way back in the mid-1840’s. Photo from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dr._Samuel_A._Bemis_(American_-_View_of_a_Barn_in_New_Hampshire_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

 

3. Martin van Butchell
(1735-1814)
Martin van Butchell was a London dentist during the 1760s. Without access to the anesthetics that we have today, dentists were probably not very popular. It seems Mr. Butchell had some extremely unique marketing ideas. When his wife passed away Mr. Butchell had two friends, Dr. William Hunter and Dr. William Cruikshank, help to embalm her and then he used her as an attraction to gain more patients! Creepy.

Dr. Butchell was quite eccentric – riding around London on his purple spotted horse! Image from: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Martin_van_Butchell._Woodcut._Wellcome_V0005978.jpg

 

4. Dipak Nanalal Chudasama
(20 May 1963)
Mr. Chudasama was a Kenyan cricket player known as “The Doc”, a nickname earned because he is also an orthodontist. He made his cricket debut around 1980, and by 1996 he was representing Kenya at the World Cup! Playing in the 1990, 1994, and 1997 ICC Trophies, he was also in 20 One-Day international matches. Sounds like he was an incredible representative of the sport!

The 1996 Kenyan World Cup cricket team. Photo taken from: http://www.cricketcountry.com/articles/world-cup-1996-kenya-shock-undercooked-west-indies-23540

 

5. Edgar Buchanan
(20 March 1903- 4 April 1979)
Edgar was an American film and television actor. You might remember him from shows like Petticoat Junction, Green Acres, and Beverly Hillbillies. What you may not know is that Mr. Buchanan, before working as an actor, had followed in his father’s footsteps by becoming a dentist! Your young patients won’t know who he is, but maybe their parents will!

Dr. Buchanan (pictured bottom left) in his iconic role as Uncle Joe in Petticoat Junction. Photo taken from: http://tralfaz.blogspot.com/2012/06/no-1-man-in-hooterville.html

Go share your new knowledge of these famous dentists!

 

Fun Facts for Kids – The ‘Tooth’ About Ancient Dentistry

September 2nd, 2014

Did you know that dentistry is thousands of years old? Even ancient Egypt had dentists! And they certainly needed them – ancient Egyptians ate a lot of coarse grains and honey-sweetened foods that weakened their teeth and caused tooth decay. One mummy was found to have died because of all the problems with his teeth! (If that’s not a reason to make annual trips to the dentist we don’t know what is).

So how did ancient dentists treat their patients? Here are some of the solutions that people came up with:

Ancient Toothpaste:

In prehistoric times hunter-gatherers ate the purple nutsedge plant. It was a great nutritious food for nomadic people and was even used in ancient Egypt to make perfume. It also had the fortunate benefit of preventing tooth decay! Sadly, the purple nutsedge is classified as a weed now.

Roman Teething Charm:

L0057125 Teething charm, Roman, 100-500 CE

Photo from wellcomeimages.org

Ancient Dentures:

Archeologists recently discovered the grave of an ancient Celtic woman who had a tooth implant. The archeologists found an iron pin that would have been inserted into the gum of the woman to hold the replacement tooth in place. Ouch! Talk about grin and bear it. They don’t know what the fake tooth would have been made of, but fake teeth made of bone and shell have been found in other burial sites.

Roman votive offering of clay baked teeth:

L0035826 A clay-baked teeth. Roman votive offering

 

Photo from wellcomeimages.org

Mesoamerican Bling:

The Celts weren’t the only ones who tried to improve their smiles. Ancient Mesoamerican men often added a little flash with gem-studded teeth. The dentists, working about 2,500 years ago (!), would have used obsidian drills to get through the top layer of the tooth. They used a glue that included natural resins and crushed bone to attach precious stones like jade to give these guys their bright smiles.
Etruscan Dentures:

L0058137 Copy of an Etruscan denture, Europe, 1901-1930

Photo from wellcomeimages.org

Close up of a Chinese medical signboard advertising a dentist using actual teeth:

link4

Photo from wellcomeimages.org

If you liked these facts be sure to check out our Chew On This wall décor. You can get these facts and more or a custom message to decorate your office walls!