Posts Tagged ‘patient education’

Engage, Entertain, and Educate – The Three E’s of Creating Office Decor for Kids

August 1st, 2018

IDS has gained notoriety as being the go-to company for creating office spaces designed with children in mind. When we design for kids we of course engineer the toughest product available, but we also look at the psychological side of how our creations will help children prepare for an appointment.

For this we follow the Three E’s: Engage, Entertain, and Educate!
 

Engage

Passively sitting and waiting for an appointment allows children’s anxiety to grow and fester. IDS wants to engage kids’ minds and bodies in activities in order to distract and calm them, creating good memories associated with their visit to the dentist. You won’t see faces like this at an IDS themed office:

Young patients aren’t just at an office for treatment; they are there to learn. Proving children an opportunity to engage in their education encourages a deeper understanding of their oral health, setting them up for a future of healthy teeth!

The end goal we hope to achieve by transforming an office is to promote a better appointment to allow for smoother, faster treatments and to encourage care to be continued at home.
 

Entertain

Time flies when you’re having fun! This phrase exists for a reason. The busier someone is during a time interval, the faster that time interval will feel like it has passed. There is a lot less time for a child to get anxious, bored, or build up tension about an upcoming procedure if they are lost in play.

From the study Influence of Positive Distractions on Children in Two Clinic Waiting Areas:

“Data analysis shows that the introduction of distraction conditions was associated with more calm behavior and less fine and gross movement, suggesting significant calming effects associated with the distraction conditions. Data also suggest that positive distraction conditions are significant attention grabbers and could be an important contributor to improving the waiting experience for children in hospitals by improving environmental attractiveness.”

IDS gaming tablets, slides, theaters, and play forts provide a number of outlets for kids to burn energy and reduce stress. Whether they are crawling around a play area, laughing at a funny kids movie playing in the theater, or using their mind to solve puzzles on an iPad, kids are having fun!

children palying on gaming tablets in reception area

The proof is in the reviews from parents. Taken from actual online reviews of our clients:

“Makes coming to the dentist fun and something to look forward to!”

“My son left the dentist with a huge smile, asking to come back again!!”

“If you’re a kid and you need to go to the dentist, this is the place to go! The atmosphere is fun, friendly, and eases the anxiety of seeing a dentist!”

If our theming isn’t fun for kids, then we’re not doing our jobs!
 

Educate

Last, but not least, we want to encourage the education of your patients when they visit your office. While making sure kids are having fun is our main goal, we want to ensure that we have an impact on the health of children as well.

Chair-side education is the current model for delivering information to patients. But is this the best way for them to absorb information? Studies show that using passive learning vs active learning creates a stark contrast in the retention of a lesson.

Many studies have found that, while individuals have various learning styles, on average people remember 90% of what they do compared to 20% of what they hear. When you were a student, did you learn more in a lecture hall or when you were actively working on a patient’s mouth? Kids are the same. Passive learning disempowers the student and takes the fun out of learning.

It is important that education is fun at a young age. Research has shown that if students do not consider a learning activity worthy of their time and effort, they might not engage or may even disengage all together in response (Fredricks, Blumenfeld, & Paris, 2004).

Waiting rooms are a place where children can experience hands-on learning and experiment with large replica teeth and other educational installations while still feeling as if they are just playing.

A large tooth with a cavity that emits a foul stink when you press a button gives a vivid demonstration of what actually happens to a rotten mouth. That’s memorable!

IDS is dedicated to helping your patients have the best possible experience when they visit your office. Every office we create is ready to Engage, Entertain, and Educate!

 

IDS Experts – Dental Education Stations Engage Patients While They Wait

May 30th, 2017

As an expert at designing displays for museums and engaging children in educational activities, I know how to attract people to focal points, create a safe and interactive environment, and make education a fun activity.

Educating the public is a skill. Whether it’s for museum visitors or dental and medical patients, the same rules apply.

Here are the questions I ask myself during every project we create here at IDS:

  • Will the target audience be engaged and find it appealing?
  • Is the content clear and are the learning outcomes relevant to what you want to express?
  • Is it durable, safe, and robust enough to handle children?
  • If there are moving parts or any electronics, is there a plan for ongoing maintenance?

Part of the education we provide is through interactive displays and education stations. These are a great way to engage both children and adults and can be a fun way to draw people in for a more appealing and memorable dental experience.

Our latest tool for helping dentists educate patients is the Education Station. Whether it’s a feature in your waiting room, or a dedicated educational room filled with different stations that teach various aspects of dental care, there is a lot we can teach young patients about their teeth.

These stations include great educational tools like:

  • A giant model of a mouth so children can learn how to brush and floss their teeth.
  • An interactive station lets them touch and smell giant teeth with stinky cavities.
  • Microscopes that reveal real plaque up close while an illustrated graphic explains why plaque is bad.
  • A custom quiz app tests their dental knowledge.

Using touch, smell, informative visuals, hands-on tutorials, and electronic games, Education Stations are engaging for different ages and will be appealing to different learning styles. Patients are given a new level of education that they might not receive at home.
 

Designing interactives that are strong enough for kids.

I often need to ask questions such as “what is the best case to protect this tablet’s screen from damage?” and “what size of screws are needed to keep this item secure?”. I ensure that the interactives we add to office environments are durable enough for everyday wear and tear from children while still delivering the fun or educational message you want to convey.

As a company, we focus on details that may seem insignificant to some, but to us, they are extremely important and can transform an office from typical to extraordinary.

From our artists to our engineers, we pride ourselves on the level of expertise each team member brings to the projects we create. Our experts want to offer some insight into their work and offer professional advice to help your dental office reach its full potential.

April
Pre-Production Manager
Exhibit Design Diploma
Joined IDS in 2011
 

Fun Facts for Kids – Space: The Final Dental Frontier

May 1st, 2015

Down here on Earth we take for granted how easy it is to brush and floss our teeth, but for the astronauts on the International Space Station, dental care is no easy task.

Water is a precious resource in space and without gravity you can’t have running water; you don’t have a sink or a tap. So what do you do?

As it turns out, brushing your teeth in space is tricky, but the tools are the same as here on Earth. From the earliest Apollo flights to current modern space travel, an astronaut’s oral hygiene kit has always consisted of a basic toothbrush and a tube of toothpaste.

However, the actual act of brushing is a bit tricky, as Commander Chris Hadfield , the first Canadian to walk in space, demonstrates in the following video:

With the absence of gravity, getting water onto your toothbrush takes a bit more finesse, and toothpaste has to be spit into a towel instead of a sink.

Some astronauts have begun experimenting with edible toothpaste to further reduce water waste.

From Clayton C. Anderson, Former resident of the ISS for 152 days in 2007, 12 days in 2010:

“It is ABSOLUTELY okay to swallow your toothpaste while living in outer space!  I swallowed my Crest mint-flavored toothpaste at least 304 times during a 152-day stay in 2007.  Downing your spit –laced with the minty fresh flavoring from the toothpaste tube– may sound disgusting, but it actually can be considered as a “space-age after dinner mint!”

During earlier, short-term missions, dental health wasn’t a big issue because astronauts were only gone a week or two at most.

Now that we have much longer missions to the International Space Station, healthy mouths are a top priority.

Astronauts make regular visits to the dentist before any flight to treat any possible problems. Just remind your patients of this important fact if they think they skip their regular visits. If they want to grow up to be an astronaut they need to learn to love the dentist!

Moreover, since Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Romanenko developed a toothache on a 96-day mission and spent weeks in pain before returning to earth, tools for dental care have since been added to each crew’s emergency medical kit. Dental care is important, both here on Earth and up in space! Amazing!